Cultural Variations in Attachment

Cross-Cultural Variations in Attachment Definition: The ways members of a society/culture vary in terms of their social practices (child-rearing). These variations, in turn, can effect infant development and behaviour. This can lead to cultural differences in attachment type.

Animal Studies of Attachment: Lorenz and Harlow

Lorenz, animal studies of attachment: Lorenz’s research investigates the Evolutionary Explanation of attachment suggesting that infants are pre-programmed to form an attachment from the second that they are born. The findings from Lorenz’s research (as outlined below) offers support for the idea that infants have an attachment gene and that they imprint on a caregiver not long after birth.

Cultural Variations in Attachment

Cross Cultural Variations in Attachment, (Description, AO1): Cross-Cultural Variations in Attachment Definition: The ways members of a society/culture vary in terms of their social practices (child-rearing). These variations, in turn, […]

The Evolutionary Theory of Attachment

There are two main explanations of infant attachment; The Learning Theory of Attachment, and the Evolutionary Theory of Attachment. The Evolutionary Theory of Attachment as put forward by John Bowlby […]

Animal Studies of Attachment: Lorenz and Harlow

Animal research investigating infant and caregiver attachment. A description and evaluation of Lorenz’s research offering support for the Evolutionary Theory of attachment. A description and evaluation of Harlow’s research offering support for the learning theory of attachment.

The Role of the Father, Multiple Attachments

This page focuses on research into the role of the father in the formation of multiple attachments. Particular attention is paid to the parent-infant attachment and researched by Schaffer and Emerson (1964), The role of the father as investigated by Grossman (2002) and father’s and primary caregivers as researched by Field (1978). The page also includes an evaluation of the research into the role of the father and attachment formation with infants.